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Archery

What is visually impaired Archery?

Visually impaired archery is the same as sighted archery. We all use bows and arrows and shoot at a target. The difference is that because some of us can’t see the target we use a different type of sight called a “tactile sight”.

How do I take part in visually impaired Archery?

A woman at full draw with a recurve bow, aiming at an outdoor target.To participate in archery, you need to join an archery club and complete a 4 to 6 session beginners’ course. But don’t be scared off; it’s about teaching you the basic techniques and making sure you can shoot safely. Beginners’ courses run throughout the year and usually cost between £40 and £60.

Once you’ve learned to shoot and started to develop a good style, you will need some equipment to help you shoot consistently:

  • Foot locators to ensure your feet stay in the same position for each shot.
  • Tactile sight on a tripod to help you line up with the centre of the target
  • A sighted assistant (known as a spotter) to help you shoot safely and to tell you where the arrows hit the target.

Where can I take part in visually impaired Archery?

There are a large number of archery clubs around the country who support visually impaired archers. To find out more about visually impaired archery, email Carol Davies, the archery section’s secretary (secretary@bbsarchery.org.uk). Our archery section has their own website with detailed information about the sport.
British Blind Sport Archery Section Website
As you improve you may want to start competing against other visually impaired archers. British Blind Sport Archery run 2 national competitions every year; one indoor and one outdoor. To ensure a fair and equal competition, all archers shoot in their own sight classification.

You may also want to shoot against sighted archers - and of course WIN!  This is possible as archery has a system for scoring which makes it fair for all abilities.

Anyone who is visually impaired will already have a CVI or BD8, which you’ll need to show to the British Blind Sport Archery secretary. You’ll also need a sight classification - these are free when you become a British Blind Sport member.

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